Sunday, April 4, 2010

Edit "Save Password" Exceptions in Google Chrome for Mac OS X

If you're a Google Chrome for Mac OS X user and you've ever hit "Never for this site" by accident (or have girlfriend who does so consistently), it's a little tricky finding out how to edit these "Save Password" exceptions. It's pretty clear for Windows' Chrome:

http://www.google.com/support/chrome/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=156325

but I had trouble finding a solution for the Mac. A little snooping reveals that Chrome keeps its login information in a SQLite database file:
~/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome/Default/Login Data
To remove an entry from the exception list, do the following:
  1. Shut down Chrome

  2. Probably a good idea to make a backup of the database file

  3. Open the database file in a SQLite database browser; I use SQLite Database Browser

  4. Select the "Browse Data" tab

  5. Sites for which "Never for this Site" has been selected will have the value 1 for the column blacklisted_by_user. Double-click the desired cell, change the value to 0, and click "Apply Changes"

  6. Save and close the database file

  7. Restart Chrome

20 comments:

Len Flack said...

This worked perfectly. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

This was a perfect set of instructions - precise and accurate. Thank you very much!!

Lester Cheung said...

Nice find. Ta!

Dominic Allkins said...

Perfect - thank you.

Why Google can't just put a simple fix in place I don't know. At least someone out there has the solution.

JSchlatter said...

Just what I needed. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

very smart! thanks a lot

Liam said...

Thanks for this. Was going crazy over it as I just switched to a Mac from Windows about a month ago. I had remembered the setting from when I was on Windows, but couldn't for the life of me figure it out on Mac. I was going insane thinking I just couldn't find it.

Quick Goggle search and I found this page :)

Anonymous said...

awesome - worked great. thank you! annoyed google didn't make it easier, but whatever. :-)

Anonymous said...

GENIUS!! Thanks for this ... I was going CRAZY

ian said...

I just love blogging and as i get spare time from busy schedule i start working on it. Wonderful post, I really enjoyed reading it!

sjbentley said...

Awesome. Thanks for solving my niggle of the day.

PKV Rechner private Krankenversicherung said...

I like your blog.

Anonymous said...

Q.- So... if I found "AshleyMadison.com/app/public/login.p" in the password exceptions on my Google Chrome, this means that someone in my house visited this site... right? I just tried going to the site (which I've never been to until now, but I fear that my spouse has) and you can even enter the wrong password and it prompts this... any advice to further clarify?

Vic said...

Wow. You are correct, that entry would seem to indicate that someone visited that site, logged in, and clicked "Never for this site."

Anonymous said...

But I went to that page and tested this... Even if you don't enter the correct password, it offers to save password... Is there any way for me to see how far this went? I want to confirm if anyone's guilty or not :-( ugh. This sucks! Do you know anything about stealth monitors? Are there any that are truly undetectable?

Vic said...

Probably because of the way the site is designed, Chrome is erroneously detecting a successful login. Still, I think you already have enough evidence that someone at least attempted a login, then clicked "Never for this site."

It sounds like you are looking for a technical solution to a relational problem. I don't know your situation, but I would say you already have enough to expect an explanation. Good luck.

Anonymous said...

Thank you. Sorry to ask these questions on your blog. I know you weren't expecting to give relationship advice. Do you know anything about these stealth monitors and keyloggers? I have to go visit a sick family member... I though I would install it on my computer to see what happens while I'm gone. I need tangible proof before I end a marriage. Do you have any suggestions or know where I can look? I need a program that only I can find. He's good with computers.

Vic said...

Sorry, I don't.

If he is good with computers, your chances of pulling this off are pretty low, I would think.

Anonymous said...

Hi there... Me again... Am I able to see login or passwords from the login data file of Google Chrome password exceptions? If so, how? I have the SQLite browser but have never used it...

Vic said...

You should be able to see passwords through Chrome's "Manage saved passwords..." dialog. Click on the desired password field and a "Show" button will appear.